WSU Whatcom County Extension

Flea Beetle

Flea Beetle Control Treatment Evaluation and Demonstration in Western Washington State     

Flea Beetle

Flea Beetle

 

Flea Beetle Control Treatment Evaluation and Demonstration in Western Washington State


With the increasing number of organic farms within proximity to one another, pests can easily move from one farm to another through the entire season. One such pest that is causing a problem in Whatcom County is the crucifer flea beetle (Phyllotreta cruciferae (Goeze)). Organic farmers have limited options for controlling this pest. A research project coordinated by WSU Whatcom County Extension attempts to evaluate cultural control methods for the crucifer flea beetle in Western Washington State.

 

Flea Beetle

 

Adult Identification:

• Small (1/16th- 1/8th inch)
• Black
• Able to jump 6-12 inches when disturbed

 

Flea Beetles with Ruler

 

Life Cycle (in most regions of North America):

• One generation per year
• Adults emerge in spring and feed on crucifers
• Lay eggs in soil in early to mid summer
• Hatched larvae feed on roots, but do little damage
• Pupation in soil
• New adults feed before overwintering on field edges

 

Damage

 

Adult Damage:

• Chew 1mm to 5mm holes in leaves
• Salad greens, mustards, other Brassicas
• New leaves are favored – seedlings can be destroyed

 

Whatcom County Integrated Pest Management

 

"Integrated Pest Management, IPM, is a decision making approach to pest management that involves knowing the crop, the pest, the ecosystem, and the relationship between all of these components."


For more information on the project, or if you are interested in participating as a test farm, please contact:

Colleen Burrows
IPM Coordinator
(360) 676-6736

WSU Whatcom County Extension • 1000 N. Forest St., Suite 201, Bellingham, WA 98225 • (360) 778-5800 • whatcom@wsu.edu